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Roll of Honor

 

 

I-R

Camp Fannin, Texas
Infantry Replacement Training Center

U.S.
Army, 1943-46

ROLL OF HONOR (I through R) of Fannin Veterans who died in uniform during World War II.

All gave some, but some gave all.
(Courtesy of Mrs. Wilmer Carol Jumper Mercer, daughter of Isaac Wilmer Jumper)


Men and women who died in the service of their country during World War II who had been stationed at Camp Fannin, Texas. Available information is identified by the following alphabetical code:

a) hometown or state;
b) dates and unit at Camp Fannin;
c) date and place of death;
d) unit assignment at time of death;
e) circumstances of death;
f) places of burial (temporary and permanent);
g) name and relationship of person(s) submitting information;
h) miscellaneous information (awards, age at death, etc.)


Shelby Stanton’s reference work, Order of Battle, U.S. Army, World War II, is especially helpful in providing supplemental information for expanded profiles of men and women who died in the service of their country during World War II who had been stationed at Camp Fannin Texas. Specifically, its combat narratives enable us to locate a given unit on a given date and describe the action it was involved in. Stanton’s references when used appear in entry e) in the expanded profiles, “circumstances of death” and are cited thus: e) Stanton: “…”.  For a copy of a division's complete combat narrative as reported in Stanton, send a stamped,  self-addressed envelope to Camp Fannin Roll of Honor, 2213 Mendoza Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32304.


Jackson through Ryan

Men and women who died in the service of their country during World War II who had been stationed at Camp Fannin, Texas. Available information is identified by the following alphabetical code: a) hometown or state; b) dates and unit at Camp Fannin; c) date and place of death; d) unit assignment at time of death; e) circumstances of death; f) places of burial (temporary and permanent); g) name and relationship of person(s) submitting information; h) miscellaneous information (awards, age at death, etc.) Updated 11 November 2014.

JACKSON, Kenneth D., Pvt., 37739022. a) Augusta, Kansas. b) March-Sept. 1944, B/63/13. c) 20 Nov. 44, Germany. d) 175/29. e) Stanton: The 29th Division began the offensive for the Roer 16 Nov. 44 with the 115th and 175th Regiments leading…The 175th took and lost Bourheim and then recaptured it and held it in the face of strong German counterattacks. f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot E, Row 6, Grave 15. g) John C. Oliver, 140 Residence, El Dorado, Kansas 67042-1544, from information provided by Kenneth Jackson’s wife, Frances E. Jackson, 1301 Dearborn St., Augusta, Kansas 67010-1823: "…Would like very much to hear from you if you have any information. We had two little girls age 2 and 4." Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

JAMES, George P., 38347854. b) Fall 43-Spring 44, B/63/13   f)  Fort Sam Houston, Texas.  Added 13 March 2014, courtesy Shane Olson.    g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653. In same company at Fannin. Received information from George James’ wife in 1946.

 

 

 

JAROSZ, Walter A., PFC, 33925241. a) Pennsylvania. c) 6 April 45, Germany. d) 290/75. e) Stanton: The 75th Division attacked across the canal at Waltrop on 4 April 45 and began clearing the approaches to Dortmund. The division was reinforced by the 320th Inf. and reached the Ruhr at Witten with four regiments, taking two bridges intact.  f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot N, Row 15, Grave 6. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

JARVIS, Julian Wrenn, Sgt., 33730596, DOB January 13, 1925.  a)  Bladensburg, Maryland.  b)  Sept. 12, 1943 – March 1944, C/52/11. c)  August 30, 1944 at Keralleunoc, France, vicinity of Brest in Brittany.  d)  L Co., 9th Regt., 2nd Infantry Division.  e)  Stanton:  The 2nd Infantry Division advanced across the Vire River and took Tinchebray on August 15, 1944.  On August 17 it moved west into Brittany and on August 25 began the assault on  the strong outer defenses of  the German fortified city of Brest.  By September 2, it had seized Hill 105 which dominated the eastern approaches. f)  United States Military Cemetery at St. James, France; re-buried July 9, 1948 at Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, Section 12, Site 2390.  g) Niece,  Eileen M. Jarvis Buckley, 9811 Bacon Court, Fairfax, Virginia 22032.  h)  Julian was one of five brothers who served in the military during World War II. It is to be noted that he had been in the Army only a year and three weeks at the time of his death, but had already earned three stripes.  In a letter to Julian’s mother dated June 16, 1946 from Headquarters 9th U. S. Infantry at Fort Lewis, Washington, the regimental commander advised Mrs. Jarvis  that a chapel at Fort Lewis  had been dedicated to “…Julian, and to the other men who so bravely fought and died for our country while members of this famous Regiment.”  Julian received the Purple Heart Medal and Combat Infantry Badge.   

 

JEHLE, Charles W., PFC.  37647566  a)  West Liberty, Iowa.  b) 10/2/44-?  c)  9 June 1945, Hill 95, Okinawa.  d)  17/7  e)  Stanton:  On 26 May 1945, the 7th Infantry Division ran into enemy strongpoints covering Shuri.  The  division  had seized key positions by the end of the month in spite of this opposition, and reached the southeast coast of Okinawa on 3 June 1945.  The battle for Hill 95 began 5 June 1945 as the 17th and 32nd Regiments used naval gunfire, corps artillery, and flame-throwing tanks.   f) Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii, Plot E, Row 0, Grave 794. g) Kent L. Jehle, nephew, 5094 Lower West Branch Road SE, Iowa City, Iowa; (319) 356-5832, daytime.  Additional information provided by Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h)  Bronze Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

JEMES, William Wilfred, Pvt., 37645472. a) Lebanon, Missouri. b) A/83/15, Aug-Dec 44. c) 20 March 1945, Germany. d) 304/76. e) Lost while crossing Moselle River. f) Cuba Cemetery, Laclede County, Missouri. g) Wilbert W. Amos, 301 E. Fremont Rd., Lebanon, Missouri 65536-4365. ""I knew him before we went into the service and we were in the same barracks at Camp Fannin. Learned of his death from friends."   h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

JOHNSON, Lionel F. a) Snyder, Texas. b) Fall 43-Spring 44, B/63/13. c) 1944 or 45, Philippines. g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653. In same company at Fannin. J.D. says: "In 1948 or 49 I worked for Calloway Cartage, Ft. Worth, Texas. Lionel F. Johnson’s tombstone came onto my loading dock and I taped a letter to it. A few days later his mother wrote and said he was killed in the Philippine Islands."

 

 

JOHNSON, Thurman A., Pvt., 38532706. a) Texas. c) 14 Oct. 44, near Wuerselen, Germany. d) 116/29. e) Stanton:  The 116th Infantry Regiment  was detached from the 29th Div. and participated in the Uebach Bridgehead Battle 5 Oct. 44, the Aachen Gap fighting 13 Oct. 44, and frontally assaulted Wuerselen.  f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot L, Row 18, Grave 4. g) Bart J. Engram, 1214 McLynn Ave. NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30306.   h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

JOHNSTON, Roy E., Pvt.  a)  Glenlyn, Virginia.  b)  Fall 1943.  c)  May 14, 1944, Italy.  f) Peterstown Cemetery, Rich Creek, Virginia.   Added 13 March 2014, courtesy Shane Olson.  Previously reported missing in action; body not recovered.  g)   Shane Olson, Adjutant, 9th District Sons of American Legion, 216 Railroad Avenue South, Halma, Minnesota 56729-2908, who learned of his death while researching for soldiers  killed during the war.  h)  Entered the service August 1943, trained at Camp Fannin, arrived in Italy March 1944, reported missing in action on May 14.  Age 29 at death.  Survivors included wife.  An 8-year employee of the Christianburg Canning Company, finally in charge of produce sales in the West Virginia territory where “he made an enviable record for three years before being called to military duty.”  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

 

JUMPER, Isaac Wilmer, Pvt., 38686968. a) Quinlan, Texas. b) May 25-Oct. 26, 1944, D/58/12. c) 17 Jan. 45, Schoppen, Belgium. d) F/16/1. e) Killed by an enemy shell burst while on a three-man patrol. Per letter to Mrs. Jumper from Headquarters, 16th Regiment: "Your husband was killed in action on 17 Jan. 1945 during an assault by the 16th Infantry against enemy defensive positions on the northern flank of the German Ardennes Salient in Belgium. Advancing through heavy snow, the assault units attacked the enemy positions and occupied a vital road center forcing the enemy to withdraw and hastening the collapse of the enemy’s offensive effort. In this action your husband was instantly killed by the explosion of an enemy artillery shell." f) Henri Chapelle Cemetery in Belgium, reburied at West Cemetery in Quinlan, Texas. g) Daughter, Carol Jumper Mercer, 6355 Newt Patterson Road, Mansfield, Texas 76063; (817) 478-3827; cwmercer@flash.net, pvtjumper@yahoo.com. h) Bronze Star (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Per letter from his company headquarters: "Isaac at all times was a good soldier and was well-liked by both officers and men. He continually displayed the habits and bearing of a soldier and gentleman, and had the real respect and friendship of all who knew him. He died as he lived, courageously, in the performance of a difficult mission." Photo at left shows Memorial Bench at Camp Fannin Memorial on  site of the old camp near Tyler, Texas..

 

 

KAHLER, Albert A., Pvt., 37708121.   a)  Park, Kansas.  b) Spring 1944.  c)  23 December 1944, Luxemburg.  d) F/10/5.  e.  Stanton:  On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes counteroffensive began, and the 5th Infantry Division relieved the 95th Infantry Division at the Saarlautern bridgehead, attacking out of it 18 December 1944.  After slow progress, Waldbilling and Haller fell 25 December 1944.  f)  Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, Plot G, Row 10, Grave 17.  g)  Mary L. Koch, <Idaknow@worldnet.att.net> . h)  Before entering the service Albert farmed the home place,  his father Joe Kahler having died a year to the day before Albert's death. Albert Kahler had returned to the front lines in the middle of November after having been hospitalized in England for wounds received September 18 near Arnaville on the Moselle River. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

KENWELL, Philip E., PFC, 34813458. a) Birmingham, Alabama. b) Sept. 43-Feb. 44, A/53/11. c) 24 Sept. 44, Northern Italy. d) E/351/88. e) Stanton:  The 88th Division crossed the Arno River 1 Sept. 44 and continued advancing until relieved 6 Sept. 44 for regroupment. The division was committed back to the front 21 Sept. 44 … and battled on Mt. Acuto and repulsed counterattacks 24 Sept. 44.    f) Florence American Cemetery, Florence, Italy, Plot E, Row 11, Grave 14. g) Bart J. Engram, P.O. Box 311774, Enterprise, Alabama 36331. Bart writes: "Philip was my bunkmate during training at Camp Fannin. I was notified by his family shortly after his death." This additional information provided in a 10 May 2005 letter and e-mail from Bart J. Engram, Jr.: "This information came from Gerry Battino, who served with Philip in Italy: 'Phil and I were on point when we were fired on by a sniper.  He was killed as he tried to locate the sniper's position.  It was a bright, sunny afternoon and the hillside where he fell was so green and shaded by a grove of chestnut trees.  It was the most beautiful spot I ever saw in Italy.  We were close friends.  Not a day goes by that I don't think of him.'"  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

KINGSLEY, Paul E., PFC, DOB September 16, 1925  a) Perth, Kansas. b) Jan.-Aug. 1944. c) 18 Dec. 44, reported missing, at the Siegfried Line east of Climbach. d)  409/103.  e)  From Wikipedia: The 103rd Division crossed the Zintzel River at Griesbach 10 December. Pushing through Climbach, the 103rd crossed the Lauter River into Germany 15 December and assaulted the outer defenses of the Siegfried Line. f) American Military Cemetery, St. Avoid, France, reinterred after the war at Sacred Heart Cemetery, Sumner County, Kansas, next to his brother Dale who had been killed while in the Army Air Corps. g) Sister, Verna Welsh, 3339 Bellaire Court, Wichita, Kansas; (316) 682-9440; e-mail Welshmailman@aol.com. Mrs. Welsh writes: "I was only 10 years old when Paul was killed. Sometime in 1945 my parents received notice from the government that Paul’s orders were mixed up and he should not have been sent to Germany, since we was not fully recovered from spinal meningitis for which he had been hospitalized at Fannin on 26 May 1944. I hope someone will remember my brother and either write to me or e-mail me."  Additional information provided by Shane Olson, Halma, Minnesota, and Michelle Agriesti.and Debbie Volavka.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

KINNEAR, David. c) 21 Jan. 45, near Reipertsweiler, France. d) I/157/45. e) Stanton: The 45th Division battled in the Bitchie Pocket and captured Wingen 7 Jan. 45, but was forced out of Althorn by counterattacks 11 Jan. 45, and a battalion of the 157th was decimated northeast of Reipertsweiller 18 Jan. 45. The division was forced back to defensive positions along the Rothbach Rau-Moder River line 20 Jan. 45.  f)  Epinal American Cemetery, France, Plot B, Row 20, Grave 39. Added 13 March 2014, courtesy Shane Olson. g) Leo S. Jensen, 195 Horseshoe Circle, Athens, Georgia 30605. Leo writes: "David Kinnear was a cadreman at Camp Fannin at the time I was there. He was one of my buddies and is pictured in my book Dear Folks.  See also item about Leo on p. 8 of the Spring 1996 Camp Fannin Guidon.

 

 

 

KIRKPATRICK, Eugene Clary, Sgt., 37635110, DOB 19 November 1925. a) Chaonia,  Missouri   b) March to July or August1944, 4th Platoon, A/82/15  c) 11 November 1944, Roetgen, 9 miles southeast of Aachen, Germany  d) F/395/99  e) Stanton:  The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944.  His niece Cindy Ramshur writes that "We believe that he was shot by another member of his company when he went to use the restroom and was walking back to his foxhole.  This was confirmed by a letter in the Checkerboard newspaper in April 1996."  f) First buried at the United States Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, Plot V, Row 7, Grave 122, then repatriated in 1947 for burial in his hometown at Masonic Cemetery, Piedmont, Missouri 63957.  g) Cindy Ramshur, niece, 612 Iris Street, Piedmont, Missouri 63957.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  His niece states that there is conflicting information as to his rank in documents provided to the family. Posted 26 December 2013.

 

 

 

KLINE, Albert M., Jr., Pvt., 35828753, DOB 1925.  a) Cuyahoga County, Ohio. b) Spring-Summer 1944  c)  Dec. 15, 1944, near Climbach, Alsace, France, on German border.  d)  B/409/103.    e)  From Wikipedia: The 103rd Division crossed the Zintzel River at Griesbach 10 December. Pushing through Climbach, the 103rd crossed the Lauter River into Germany 15 December and assaulted the outer defenses of the Siegfried Line.   g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Information added 20 August 2013.

 

 

 

KUEHN, Robert J., 2nd Lt., O-538743. a) Wisconsin. b) B/83/15. c) 17 Dec. 44, France. d) 320/35. e) Stanton: The 35th Division attacked along the Blies 12 Dec. 44 where the 134th Inf. was subjected to fierce German counterattacks at Habkirken…The 137th Inf was driven out of Breiterwald…and on 19 Dec. 44 the division halted its offensive and moved to Metz for rehabilitation.   f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot J, Row 4, Grave 6. g) Leo S. Jensen, 195 Horseshoe Circle, Athens, Georgia 30605. See also item about Leo on p. 8 of the Spring 1996 Camp Fannin Guidon.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

KWIECINSKI, Leo E., 33925253. a)  Pennsylvania.  c)  4 March 1945 d) L/274/70. e)  Stanton:   The 274th and 275th Regiments cleared the heights commanding both Saarbruecken and Stiring Wendel by 24 February 1945. The division attacked beyond the Forbach-Saarbruecken Road on 3 March 1945, supported by the 12th Armored Division. The 274th finally captured Stiring Wendel on 5 March 1945. f)  Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot A, Row 40, Grave 26.  g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, C/58/13 at Fannin and C/276/70 in ETO.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

LARANCE, Willis Allen, Pvt., 38633432. a) Albany, Texas. c) 14 March 45, near Hatzenport, Germany. d) E/359/90. e)90th Infantry Division Stanton:  The 90th Division assaulted across the Moselle River in the Kattenes-Moselkern region 14 Mar. 45.  f) National Cemetery, Hamm, Luxembourg. g) Wife, Mrs. Auddrena Larance Smith, P.O. Box 831, Albany, Texas 76430. Mrs. Smith writes: "Willis did not get to complete his basic training at Camp Fannin. He and a number of his comrades were sent as replacements to Europe. I took him to the airport in Big Springs, Texas. He made it through the Battle of the Bulge, but was killed on 14 March 1945. His company suffered massive casualties and I was told the Army took them to Hamm, Luxembourg for burial. We had a young son when Willis was in training at Fannin and our daughter was born after he was killed."   h))  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

LARSON, Stanley E., PFC, 36676476, DOB 1925. a) Rochelle, Illinois. b) Aug-Nov 43, D/63/13. c) 16 December 1944, near Hofen, Belgium. d) 394/99. e)  Stanton:  The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944.  After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 December 1944 against heavy resistance from the West Wall.  On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division,  which was partially surrounded and suffered heavy losses before Elsenborn Ridge.  f)  MIA, Tablets of the Missing at Ardennes American Cemetery, Neupre, Belgium. But on June 1, 2001, Stanley E. Larson’s remains were recovered by two Belgians who were part of the MIA project.  He had spent 57 years as missing but not forgotten. On July 22, 2002 he was returned to his family and buried in what had been an empty grave at Lawnridge Cemetery,  Rochelle, Illinois.  Many thanks to Teresa  Hirsch of Indianapolis for this information.  g) Leon St. Pierre, 3325 Bain Place, Tyler, Texas 75701-8871. Same company at Fannin, both in 99th overseas. From official list of battle deaths, 99th Inf. Div. h)  Bronze Star Medal (above), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  Updated 7 October 2015.

 

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LAURIA, Joseph Ralph, PFC, 32953165. a) West New York, New Jersey  b)  1943-44.  c) 13 July 1944, near St. Lo, France.  d) G/320/35.  e) Stanton: The 35th Infantry Division arrived over Omaha Beach, France 5-8 July 1944 and the 137th Infantry Regiment attacked along the Vire 11 July 1944...The 320th Infantry Regiment held to small gains north of St. Lo. On 14 July 1944, the division was able to reach the Pont Hebert-St. Lo Highway.   f )  Interred U. S. Military  Cemetery, La Cambe, France, disinterred 31 October 1947 and returned to U. S. for burial in Veterans plot at Flower Hill Cemetery, North Bergen, New Jersey, in February 1948.  g) Nephew, Ralph P. Simeone, esimeone@ptd.net, 116 Plum Lane, Milford, Pennsylvania 18337, who writes,  "Joseph's mother Clara and his siblings, Ralph, Clara, Mary and James are all deceased and had no idea how he died. We just [2005] received his Individual Deceased Personnel File."  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

LEE, Wayford, Pvt., 38532757. a) Texas. c) 22 Sept. 44, Southern France. d) 179/45. e) Stanton: The 179th saw heavy combat at Meximieux 1-2 Sept. 44. In heavy fighting, Villersexel was seized 13 Sept. 44 and the 179th  crossed the Moselle in the Chatel area 21-22 Sept. 44.   f) Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot B, Row 8, Grave 72. g) Bart J. Engram, 1214 McLynn Ave. NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30306.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

LILLELID. a) South Dakota. b) Jan.-April 44, 82nd Bn. g) Waldemar Framstad, 3021 Shore Drive, Apt. 105, Marinette, Wisconsin 54143, who says: "all I remember is his last name, because it is a Norwegian name."

 

 

LINDHOLM, John Milton, Sgt., 39862039. a) Warren, Arizona. b) Aug.-Nov. 1943, D/63/13. c) 17 Dec. 44, vicinity of Elsenborn Ridge, Belgium. d) M/393/99. e) Per Aug. 45 letter to Johnny’s parents from his company commander, Capt. J.E. Veneklasen: "John was in command of a machine gun squad in the line, and when I assigned his friend Sgt. (now Lt.) Malcolm Pierson [also in same Fannin company and in ASTP at LSU with Johnny] to a mortar squad, I called John in to see if he wanted  to be a reconnaissance sergeant. This meant that he would live in the company command post and work with the reconnaissance officer and me. He hesitated since he did not want to leave his squad, but decided to take the job…Then when the German offensive started December 16, we found ourselves hit on all sides, and pretty much surrounded, but we held our position. That night John stayed in the same foxhole with the first sergeant and myself, taking turns at watch. On the 17th, things were no better, and John occasionally made the rounds of the gun positions, checking to see if all was well. On one trip he saw several Germans in the woods with men in American uniforms. Since the Germans had been using our uniforms to penetrate our lines, he decided to investigate, and dashed across the road. That is the last time we saw him. John was a brilliant boy (the highest IQ in the company), fearless, and with a mature head, which gained him the respect of all the officers and men despite his youth [age 19 at death]."   Stanton:  The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944.  After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 December 1944 against heavy resistance from the West Wall.  On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division which was partially surounded and suffered heavy losses before Elsenborn Ridge.  f) Remains not recovered.  MIA, Tablets of the Missing at Ardennes American Cemetery, Neupre, Belgium. g) John McGilvray, P.O. Box 164, Bolton Landing, New York 12814, same company at Fannin, together in ASTP at Lousiana State University and in combat with the 99th. See also story in Camp Fannin Guidon, Winter 1993-94, "So long, Johnny Lindholm".  Picture here shows Johnny at the end of basic training at Fannin.  h) Bronze Star Medal (above), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry  Badge.

LIPPERT, Vernon E.  f) American Military CemeteryHenri-Chapelle, Belgium. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  Posted 3 February 2016.  Additional information to come. 

 

LLOYD, Richard B., PFC, 39333746. a) Washington state. b) July-Oct. 43, 68/14. c) 12 Nov. 44, Alsace, France. d) 410/103. e) Stanton:  The division arrived at Marseille, France on 20 Oct. 44 and relieved the 3rd Inf. Div. at Chevry 8-9 Nov. 44.   f) American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot B, Row 3, Grave 16. g) Harold O. Rorem, 4112 Janet Lane, Brooklyn Center, Minnesota 55429, who writes: "Took basic training at Camp Fannin at the same time, ASTP at Texas A&M together, and together in the 103rd." Death listed on page 78 of 103rd Div. history, "The Trail of the Cactus".  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

LOCKHART, Charles, PFC, 35757553, DOB Nov. 3, 1924.  a)  Wood County, West Virginia . b) C/56/12. c) April 15,1945,023  33rd Infantry Divisionnear Asin, Luzon, north of Baguio. d) 130/33.  e)  Stanton:  The 130th Infantry Regiment captured Asin on 12 April 1945, but further advance was halted by a Japanese tunnel complex nearby.  Ground assault of the Asin Tunnels was suspended 15 April 1945 while artillery bombardment was employed to soften up the strongpoint.  f)  Foley Cemetery, South Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.  g) Gale F. Keen, P.O. Box 162, Spencer, West Virginia 25276, fellow trainee at Fannin. Charles’ girl friend wrote to Gale about his death.  Further information provided in July 2009 by Shane Olson of Halma, Minnesota, who provided a grave memorial page created by Theresa Lockhart Stockdale.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

LORD, Eugene J., PFC, 36977975. b) C/59/12. c) 25 December 1944, Battle of Bulge. d) 318/80. e) Stanton:  The division assembled in the Arlon, Luxembourg area 20 December 1944 and took Merzig after heavy combat on 23 December 1944. It contained numerous German attacks at Heiderscheid and Ettelbruck and advanced to the Sauer on 24 December 1944. The division checked German assaults near Ringel and blocked roads around Ettelbruck and Mostroff.  f) Luxembourg American Military Cemetery. g) Son, Daniel J. Lord, 643 Lexington Drive, Saline, MI 48176.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

LOWERY, Samuel. a) Fort Payne, Alabama. b) 1944, 13th Regt. c) Sept. 44. d) 104th Inf. Div. g) Harley Turner, 507 W. Wilson St., Tyler, Texas, mess sergeant in Fannin unit where Samuel was a cook. Harley writes: " He was a great guy and friend. He loved life but it didn’t last long." 

                              

 

 

                                                                                

LUCE, Thomas W., Pvt., 38481401. a) Texas. b) Jan.-May 44. c) 16 Aug. 44, St. Malo, France. d) G/329/83. e) Stanton: The 83rd reached the fortified city of St. Malo 4 Aug 44. It began the Battle of St. Malo the same day and forced back German defenders to the strongpoints of The Citadel and Dinard 9 Aug. 44. Dinard fell after severe fighting 15 Aug. 44 and The Citadel surrendered after further combat on 17 Aug. 44.  f) Brittany, France. g) William H. Ayers, Rt. 10, Box 8170, Lufkin, Texas 75904, who writes: "Trained with him at Camp Fannin, stationed at Ft. Meade, Maryland together, and shipped to France on the same ship. Learned of his death upon my return home."  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

LYMAN, James, M.,, Tech/Sgt.  37023623.   a) South Dakota. b) Spring 44. c) 16 March 45, vicinity Salvera, Italy. d)  11th AIB, 1st Armored Division.  e) Stanton:  The 1st Armored Division took Carviano 8 March 1945 and fought for Salvaro 15-27 March.  Esther Lyman, Jim’s wife, wrote the following to Mrs. Lois Whiteman on 1 July 1945: "One of the fellows who was in Jim’s company is home now. He said it happened at night and it was machine-gun fire while they were taking a town in northern Italy." f)  Brittany American Cemetery, St. James, France, Plot F, Row 1, Grave 7.  g) Mrs. Kim Groff, 6414 Shoreline Drive, Little Elm, Texas 75068, phone (972) 294-8160, e-mail <kgroff@sbcglobal,net>. Mrs. Groff is author of The Fitzgerald House, which memorializes the home at 815 South Broadway Avenue in Tyler where Mrs. Lois Whiteman welcomed so many Fannin service men during the war. Mrs. Groff discovered letters to Mrs. Whiteman from many whom she had befriended including Esther Lyman, and some of Mrs. Lyman’s letters appear in her book.  Additional information provided by Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.  h)  Silver Star, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

LYNN, Felmer Lonzo (“Pete”), Pfc., 34963373. a) Kings Mountain, North Carolina.  b) March-July 1944, C/84/15.  c) November 2, 1944 near Kommerscheidt, Germany during Hurtgen Forest Campaign.  d) B/112/28.  e)  Stanton:  On 26 October 1944, the 28th U.S. Infantry Division takes over the sector of the battle-weary 9th U.S. Infantry Division. The reinforced 28th U.S. Infantry Division is given the mission to secure the Vossenack/Schmidt/Lammersdorf area and to attack the German troops in the Monschau Corridor from the rear. H-hour will be 0900 hours on 2 November 018  28th Infantry Division1944, which is All Souls' Day. Therefore, the records will later come to refer to this battle as the ‘All Souls' Day Battle.’ At 0800 hours on 2 November 1944, American artillery opens  fire. One hour later, the first infantry companies leave their positions in Germeter, protected by tanks.  On 8 November 1944, the American troops break off combat action. Under cover of darkness, the remnants of the 112th Infantry Regiment are extracted - 300 out of formerly 2,200 men.  f)  First buried at Henri Chapelle American Military Cemetery, Grave 190.  Body returned to Kings Mountain, North Carolina November 13, 1947.  Buried in Mountain Rest Cemetery, Kings Mountain, N. C.  g)  Daughter, Felma Lynn Bass, 55 Allison Lane, Sparta, North Carolina 28675, born after her father’s death.  h)  "My father had just turned 34 years old when he was killed," his daughter writes.  "He was killed on my mother's 29th birthday.  I had two older sisters who were 3 and 2 at the time of his death."

 

 

MANKE, Luther,  Cpl.  b)  1944-45, B/82/15.  c)  May 14, 1945, Okinawa. g)  Frank A. Smith, <ab034@earthlink.net>, via Cpl. Manke's niece, Janette Chambers, <jc4christ@juno.com>.  h) Frank A. Smith writes: "Cpl. Manke was cadre and had a bunk in our barracks all the time I was in basic,  from December 1944 to April 1945.  He was the only cadre in our barracks."

 

MARTIN, Raymond, Pvt., 38550113.  a)  Kennard, Texas.  b)  Fall 1944, C/63/13.  c)  2  December 1944, Camp Fannin, Texas.  d)  C/63/13.  e)  Death accidentally occurred on firing range; dead on arrival at Station Hospital.  f)  Sardis Cemetery, Rusk, Texas.  g) Son, Raymond  H. Martin, 1374 County Road 4700, Kennard, Texas 75847.

 

 

MARTIN, Robert. a) Telford, Tennessee. b) Aug.-Dec. 44, C/68/14. c) ETO. g) Carl D. Mathes, 6760 Lee Ave., Radford, Virginia 24141. In same company at Fannin, separated at Ft. Meade, Maryland.

 

 

MATLOCK, Clayton F. b) 1944, C/82. c) 2 May 1944, Camp Fannin. e) One of two 82nd Battalion trainees (the other was James J. Cox, Jr. of A/82) crushed by trees blown down by a sudden violent windstorm while the battalion was on bivouac. g) Ruby Neilson, 417 Bond St., Hillsboro, Texas 76645, widow of former CFA president Gordon Neilson. Ruby was a reporter on The Tyler Courier-Times when she and Gordon met and she found the story about Clayton F. Matlock’s death in the May 2, 1944 edition of The Tyler Courier-Times. See also story in Spring 1997 edition of Camp Fannin Guidon.

 

 

 

McCOY, John F., 36758561. a) Chicago, Illinois. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) ETO. d) 393/99. g) Elmer T. Horne, Jr., Tallahassee, Florida. Same company at Fannin, then together in ASTP at La. St. Univ. Official list of battle deaths, 99th Inf. Div., provided by Leon St. Pierre, Tyler, Texas. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

 

MCGUINESS, William T., Pvt., 42180059.  a)  Kings County, New York.  b) Sept-Dec. 1944, 58/12.  c)  March 15, 1945, at Siegfried Line south of Zwiebrucken, Germany.  d)  30th Regt., 3rd Inf. Div.  e)  Stanton:   At the end of January 1945, the 3rd Infantry Division  took Horbourg and was at the outskirts of  Colmar.    On March 15, the division struck Siegfried Line positions south of Zweibrucken.       f)  Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot F, Row 7, Grave 7.  g)   Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin, and Shane Olson, Halma, Minnesota, who provided numerous additional details in July 2009.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

MILLER, Roy, Pvt. a) Oran, Missouri. b) June-September 1944. c) Italy. g) Viola M. Errett, 3024 Sunnybrook Drive, Tyler, Texas. Roy Miller and his wife Gayle and daughter Brenda (6 months) were Mrs. Errett’s neighbors while he was a trainee at Fannin.

 

 

MILLEREN, Donald W., 35147983. a) Gary, Indiana. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) ETO. d) 393/99. g) Elmer T. Horne, Jr., Tallahassee, Florida. Same company at Fannin, then together in ASTP at La. St. Univ. Official list of battle deaths, 99th Inf. Div. , provided by Leon St. Pierre, Tyler, Texas. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

MITHELMAN, Robert K. a) Minnesota. b) Oct. 43 – March 44, C/81. c) About midway through the Luzon operation, P.I. d) 1/6. e) Stanton: 1st Inf. Regt. left New Guinea 26 Dec. 44, assaulted Lingayen Gulf Philippine Islands on Luzon 9 Jan. 45.   g) Wayne A. Miller, 524 W. 18th, Kearny, Nebraska , in same company at Fannin and same regiment in combat. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

MOLLETT, Delbert C.  f) American Military CemeteryHenri-Chapelle, Belgium. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  Posted 3 February 2016.  Additional information to come.

MONNOT, Richard G., PFC, 36676541. a) Chicago, Illinois. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) 19 December 1944, near Elsenborn Ridge, Belgium.   d)  L/393/99. e)  Stanton:  The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944.  After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 December 1944 against heavy resistance from the West Wall.  On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division which was partially surrounded and suffered heavy losses before Elsenborn Ridge on 19 December 1944f)  Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot D, Row 1, Grave 36.  g) Elmer T. Horne, Jr., Tallahassee, Florida, who says: "Richard was one of my best friends during basic training at Fannin and later in ASTP at La. St. Univ. I learned of his death after returning from overseas by a chance encounter at Camp Cooke, California with a 99th Div. soldier who had known him well in combat."  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

MOREDOCK, James E., Pvt., 37646228,  a)  Jasper County, Iowa.  b) Sept-Dec. 1944, 58/12. g)  Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin.

 

MORGAN, Robert J., PFC, DOB July 29, 1917.   a) Kirbyville, Texas. b) Fall-43-Spring 44, B/63/13. c) March 3, 1945, approach to Manila, Philippine Islands. d)  128/32.  e) Stanton:  The 32nd Inf Div landed in Lingayen Gulf  on Luzon 27 Jan 45 and began the final phase of the push on Manila . The Battle for Villa Verde Trail was fought 6-22 Feb 45 which included numerous Japanese counterattacks and the division fought battles at Salacsac Pass and along the Arboredo and Ambayang Valleys in March.   f)  Zion Hill Cemetery, Jasper, Texas.  g) J. D. Henley, 12321 Swanson, Marana, Arizona 85653; (602) 682-3614. In same company at Fannin. J.D. says: "I learned of Robert’s death from two other members of our company at Fannin whom I visited after the war, Lenox Hawthorne of Silsby, Texas and Eugene Hryhobchux of Deweyville, Texas."  Additional information provided in July 2009 by Shane Olson, Halma, Minnesota and Don Wilson, Carthage, Texas..  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

MOURIN, Thomas K., Pvt., 42098437,  a)  Onondaga County, New York.  b) Sept-Dec 1944, D/58/12.  g)  Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin.

 

 

MYSLIK, Otto William, Jr., Corporal, 20271497, DOB 29 May 1910.  a)  Beloit, Wisconsin  b)  June 1, 1943-June 15, 1944, 175th Army Band (maybe the Camp Fannin Post Band).  c)  15 June 1944, Camp Fannin.  d)  175th Army Band.  e)  Perished in a barracks fire, no details known, with 2nd and 3rd degree burns over 75% of his body surface, with pneumonia being a contributing cause. But on 22 July 2015, Otto's cousin, RoseMarie Blaha, provided the following information:  "My cousin sent the following information from the June 13, 1944 issue of The Tyler  Courier Times:  " Soldier Injured in Apartment Fire" A Camp Fannin soldier was reported by city police and firemen today to have been badly burned when his garage apartment home in the 700 block of South Augusta Avenue caught fire at 1:45 a.m. The name of the soldier was not learned but firemen said he was taken to the Camp Fannin Hospital. Considerable damage was caused to the building.  Origin of the blaze was undetermined, firemen said."    f) Eastlawn Cemetery, Beloit, Wisconsin.  g)  Rose Marie Blaha, cousin, 224 Pembroke Road, Naperville, Illinois 60540 and Boca Grande, Florida, and Joan Fendrych Byerhof, niece, 100 Wilderness Drive, Naples, Florida 34105. h)  Otto W. Myslik, Jr. enlisted 3 February 1941 in the National Guard 27th New York Infantry Division and was assigned to the 207th Coast Artillery Band.  Otto’s niece, Joan Fendrych Byerhof, writes “My mother [Otto’s sister], an RN, traveled from Beloit, Wisconsin to be at her brother’s bedside but he died before she could reach him.  Otto had great talents and joy for living.”  Otto enjoyed an adventuresome pre-war career as a musician aboard cruise ships owned by United Fruit Company, Ward, and  Grace Lines, operating out of New York and traveling to Havana, Haiti, Mexico, New Brunswick, Virgin Islands, Nova Scotia, and Jamaica. Additional information posted 10 August 2015.

 

NAKAMA, Masao, Sgt., 30111494. a) Hawaii. c) 17 May 1945, Italy. d) 442nd Inf. Regt. (Nisei)(Separate). f) Listed on Honolulu Memorial, Hawaii. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h)  Bronze Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge..

 

 

 

NANCE, Steve. c) 1945, Germany. e) Killed by "friendly fire". g) Del M. Edwards, 3600 Jill Circle, Tyler, Texas, from Dr. Bob Glover, past president of Camp Ford Historical Association, Tyler, Texas.

 

 

O’BRIEN, John R., PFC, 11131809. a) Cambridge, Massachusetts. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) 19 Dec. 1944, Hofen, Belgium. d) I/395/99. e) German machine gun sprayed house six Co. I men were in at night. Stanton:  On 16 Dec. 44 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division which initially held at Hofen but gave ground to the south. The division was partially surrounded and suffered heavy losses as it retreated to new defensive positions before Elsenborn Ridge on 19 Dec. 44f)  Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot G, Row 11, Grave 49.g) Leon W. St. Pierre, first CFA president, 3325 Bain Place, Tyler, Texas 75701. In same company during basic at Fannin and both were in combat with the 99th during the Battle of the Bulge. Leon writes: "George Prager [also in the same company at Fannin and in combat with the 99th] told me about John O’Brien’s death several years ago at a 99th Division reunion. I have corresponded with John’s brother, Brendan J. O’Brien, 2278 Wood Acres Court, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15237."   h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

ODEM, Dale Raymond, Pvt., 37691916. a) Atlantic, Iowa. b) March-July 1944. c) 6 Feb. 1945, Luzon, P.I. d) 511 Prcht, 11 ABN Div. e) Stanton:  The 511 Parachute Infantry Regiment was parachuted along Tagaytay Ridge,  Luzon on 3 Feb. 45, enabling the 11th Airborne Division to completely clear it.  The 511th PIR then advanced toward Manila and seized the Paranaque River bridge at the south end of the city on 5 Feb. 1945.  All three regiments [187th Glider, 188th PIR, 511th  PIR] were involved in fierce fighting to secure Nichols Field 7-13 Feb. 1945 and then flanked Fort McKinley 12-16 Feb 1945 and captured it on 17 Feb. 1945.  The division next conducted a combined overland, amphibious, and parachute assault to liberate prisoners at the Japanese internment Camp at Los Banos 23 Feb. 1945 f) Manila American Cemetery and Memorial, P.I., Plot N, Row 1, Grave 55. g) Clark Merrill Trailer, 1009 Elm Street, Atlantic, Iowa 50022-2133, who writes: "We were childhood friends. We met again when we were inducted at Camp Dodge, Iowa. I had forgotten that Dale’s service number was the very next one after mine. We were in different units at Fannin. At the end of basic he looked me up and told me that he was joining the paratroops." h) Dale was an only child, 19 at the time of his death. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

OGG, William H., PFC. a) Dayton, Ohio. b) Sept. 44-Jan. 45. c) 27 May 45, Okinawa. d) 32/7. e) Stanton:  The 7th division rehabilitated 12-21 May 45 and on May 22 it returned to the front , driving unopposed through the Yonabaru ruins to the hills beyond. On 26 May 45 the 32nd Inf ran into enemy strongpoints covering Shuri. The division had seized key positions by the end of the month.   f) Memorial Park Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio. g) James R. Carpenter, 1673 W. Stroop, Dayton, Ohio.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

OLIVER, Allie J. c) 29 Aug. 44, France. d) E/120/30. e) Stanton:  The 30th relieved the 1st Inf. Div. near Mortrain 6 Aug. 44. It was subjected to a strong German counterattack which ruptured its lines during the Battle for Avranches.  The Division then pushed east behind the 2nd Armd. Div., taking Nonancourt 21 Aug. 44. It crossed into Belgium 2 Sept. 44 g) Vito Ludovico, 900 N. Azalea Drive, Tyler, Texas 75701-5203. Accompanying note says: "Allie was the brother of a dear friend of ours. We were sitting together at a funeral and he was asking about Camp Fannin Association, etc.".   h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

OLSEN, Emil. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, B/63/12. c) 15 May 1945, Germany. d) 14th Armd. Div. e) Emil was a guard for the CG of the 14th. e) Stanton: The 14th Armd  crossed the Isar River at Moosberg 30 Apr. 45 and fought into Landshut. Combat Command B reached the Inn River near Aschau and took the bridge there intact on 2 May 45. The division was then used to process prisoners as hostilities were declared ended on 7 May 1945.  Emil was accidentally killed on 15 May 45. g). Leo S. Jensen, 195 Horseshoe Circle, Athens, Georgia 30605, in same company at Fannin.

 

 

 

OLSON, Dean H., PFC, 11108056, DOB May 31, 1925. a) West Springfield, Massachusetts. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) November 26, 1944, east of Hofen, Germany. d) C/395/99. e)  Stanton:  The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944Dean was killed on a night patrol in the icy no-man’s land soon to be in the path of the German Ardennes Offensive.  Ray Prill, who was with Dean all the way from Camp Fannin almost to the moment of his death, says Dean came by his position and asked for an extra ammunition belt because he was going on a night patrol.  Ray handed it to him and Dean took off.  About 15 seconds later there was a loud explosion.  Dean had apparently stepped on a land mine and he died almost instantly from a severed jugular and other injuries.   f)  Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, Section 12, #2705.  g) Elmer T. Horne, Jr., 2213 Mendoza Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32304-1339. In same company at Fannin, then together in ASTP at La. St. Univ. From official list of battle deaths, 99th Inf. Div.   Much additional information provided in 2009 by Dean’s cousin Nancy Wertz of Plano, Texas, and a friend, Bill McCarron, Commerce, Texas, who are preparing to publish Dean's letters. Nancy found Ray Prill's phone number and Bill called Ray in August 2009 and learned the details of Dean's death.  Ray's address: Raymond P. Prill, 766 Grosse Pointe Circle, Vernon Hills, Illinois 60061-3413; 847-566-4129.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

OUTHWAITE, Eric R., Pvt. a) Pretty Prairie, Kansas. b) Aug.-Dec. 1944. c) 21 February 1945, Luxembourg. d) 5th Armd. Div. e) A shell exploded close to his position and fragments struck and killed him. g) E. Olen Mitchell, 2405 Colorado Street, Hutchinson, Kansas 67502. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

 

OYABU, Harumatsu.   d) L/100/442 Inf. Regt. (Nisei)(Separate). Campaigns: Naples-Foggia, Anzio, Rome-Arno, North Apennines, Rhineland, Po Valley.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

PETERSON, James Hans, PFC, 39926104.  a)  Moreland, Idaho.  c)  19 March 1945, Germany. d) 3rd Army. f) Moreland General Cemetery, Moreland, Idaho.  g)  Son, James Stoddard Peterson, 504 Oak Grove Road, San Marcos, Texas 78666, who writes, “I was a year old when my father died.  My mother told me when I was old enough to understand.”  h)  Telegram from War Department  to his wife, Mrs. Nora U. Peterson, reads: “PFC James H. Peterson had returned to duty 11 March 1945 from previously reported wound.”  He had sent a poem titled “My Prayer” to his wife just prior to his death which reads in part: “God give me strength and courage, In this hour of need, Show me light that I may find, The road that home will lead.”  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

PETTY, Jack, PFC, 38687752.  a)  Gatesville, Texas.  b)  May - November 1944.  c)  15 January 1945, in a German hospital near Frankfort.  d)  K/315/79.  e)  from letter to Jack Petty’s wife dated 16 April 1945 from personnel officer of 315th Regiment: “On 11 January 1945, Company K of which PFC Petty was a member, was defending the town of Rittershoffen, France, against fierce enemy attacks.  At about 6 a.m., after a devastating artillery barrage, the enemy’s tanks succeeded in enveloping our forward positions and the company was forced to withdraw to the center of town.  When a reorganization was effected, it was discovered that PFC Petty was missing, nor could any information be gathered as to his whereabouts.”  It developed that he had been captured, and a letter from his widow, dated 4 February 2006, picks it up at that point: “I have some information that his buddy Frank Wood gave me.  Frank and Jack were captured, and behind enemy lines, Jack was wounded by friendly fire.  Frank carried Jack as they moved from place to place for two days, then the Germans took Jack to a hospital where he died.”  f)  Initially buried at Rittershoffen, France, then repatriated and buried at Restland Cemetery in Gatesville, Texas.  g)  Lee  R. Williamson, P.O. Box 1017, Gatesville, Texas 76528-6017, (254) 865-2383; Mrs. Oma Lee Petty Coward, 2210 West U.S. Highway 84, Gatesville, Texas 76528-1055, (254)  865-5789.  h)  Jack Petty had been in the Army only eight months when he was killed.  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

PHILLIPS, Stanley D., Pvt., 33859561. a) Virginia. b) Sept.-Dec. 1944, A/58/12. c) 17 March 1945. d) B/222/42. e)  Stanton:  On 14 Feb 1945 the 42nd Inf Div as a whole entered combat, taking up defensive positions near Haguenau in the Hardt Forest.  The division attacked through the Hardt Forest  and broke through the Seigfried Line 15-21 March 1945.  f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot C, Row 18, Grave 69. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h)  Silver Star Medal,  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

PIEGER, Carl. b) July 31-Dec. 6, 1943. c) September 1944, France. d) 35th ID. f) Grandview Cemetery, Johnstown, PA. g) Emory A. Domen, 1990 Minno Drive, Johnstown, PA 15905-1172, who had 17 weeks of basic training at Fannin with deceased. Before the war, Carl Pieger owned and operated a meat market across the street from where Emory Domen lived.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

PILLARS, Clifford G. a) Columbia, Missouri. b) A/82. c) 18 October1944, Luxembourg. d) 329/83. g) L. Chancey, lchancey2@juno.com. , a fellow trainee at Fannin. h) Clifford Pillars was a field wireman at the time of his death.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

 

PIRKEY, Weldon A., PFC, 33664107. a) Mt. Crawford, Virginia. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 6 April 44, France; died of wounds received 11 Mar. d) G/276/70. e) Stanton: The 70th Division attacked beyond the Forbach-Saarbruecken Road on 3 Mar. 45 and divisional patrols reached the outposts of the West Wall on 6 Mar. 45. The German forces withdrew 13 Mar. 45 and the division began pursuit operations immediately.  f) U. S. Military Cemetery, Meuse Section, France. Reinterred St. Paul's Cemetery, Grottoes, Virginia.  g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. See also page 8, Spring 1996 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon.

 

 

PORTER, Jerald G., 2nd Lt., O-537647.  a)  Kansas.  c)  24 February 1945, near Roermond, Holland.  d) C/291/75.  e)  Stanton:  The 75th Infantry Division relieved the British 6th A/B Division along the Maas River near Roermond, Holland on 21 February 1945f)  Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot M, Row 10, Grave 17.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

POWELL,  David T. He  left for the Army after three terms at Harvard, subsequently was assigned to ASTP at Drexel Institute of Technology.  f) American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  Posted 3 February 2016.  More information to come.

 

PRATT, Harold E., Pvt., 36915415. a) Michigan. c) 30 April 45, Okinawa. d) 105/27. e) Stanton: The  27th Division made efforts to improve its position, and captured contested Machinato Airfield 28 April 45, and on 1 May 45 was relieved by the 1st Marine Div. and moved to Nago for rest. f) Honolulu Memorial, Hawaii. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h)  Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.
 

 

PYLE, Paul L., Capt., O-1294193. a) Newark, Ohio. b) company commander, A/53/11, Sept-Dec 1943. c) 3 Nov. 1944, France. d) B/71/44. e) Stanton:  The 44th Infantry Division landed at Cherbourg, France on 15 September 1944 and trained for a month before beginning the relief of  the 79th Infantry Division on 18 October 1944 at Foret de Parroy, in the vicinity of Luneville, France. The 71st Infantry Regiment went into the line 23 October 1944 followed by the 324th the next day.  The division was subjected to a strong German counterattack 25-26 October 1944 and then continued active defense of its area. The 71st and 324th attacked from Leintrey to force a passage through the Vosges Mountains.   g) Bart J. Engram, 1214 McLynn Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 30306-2530, and E. Olen Mitchell, 2405 Colorado St., Hutchinson, Kans, 67502, both trainees in Capt. Pyle’s company at Fannin. Additional information provided by  Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Bart provided a page from the company morning report of A/53/11 ending 2400 hours 2 Dec 1943, signed by Capt. Pyle and bearing this entry: "01294193 Pyle, Paul L., Capt.,  Relieved from assignment and assigned to Infantry Officers Replacement Pool this station and attached thereto 1 Dec 43." Additional infomation provided by Bart Engram, Jr., in letter and e-mail dated 10 May 1945:  "These details came from the History and Pictorial Record of the 71st Infantry Regiment, published in 1946 in Baton Rouge, La., by The Army and Navy Publishing Company: 'The 71st Infantry Regiment moved in early November 1944 into Le Remabois Woods to prepare for an attack on the small town of Leintrey.  After reaching the edge of the woods where they had a good view of the town, they came under heavy artillery and mortar fire.  While directing artillery from an exposed position, Captain Pyle was killed by enemy shell fragments from a tree burst. Many men praised the captain as a brave man and a courageous leader.'"  Bart Engram Jr. writes: "My father thought very highly of Captain Pyle and talked about how he tried to give the soldiers of A Company the best possible training. He led by example and set high standards, but showed a sense of concern for each solider. He remembered how Captain Pyle moved up and down the length of the column on road marches, checking on and encouraging the soldiers.  Dad passed away in  July 2004 at 94."  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

RATLIFF, Ova Wendell, Pvt., 35077542. a) Woodsbend, Kentucky. b) March-August, 1944, D/65/14. c) 10 Nov. 1944Hurtgen Forest. d) C/110/28. e) Assigned 7 Nov 44, reported as missing in action 14 Nov 44, a "finding of death" a year and a day later. Stanton: The 28th Div. attacked toward Schmidt 2 Nov. 44 after heavy artillery preparation and pushed into the Hurtgen Forest and over the next few days heavy fighting caused Vassenack and Schmidt to change hands several times.  f)  His remains were found in the Hurtgen Forest near the top of Oschenkopf Hill a few hundred yards southwest of the small village of Simonskall near Vossenack.  His remains were returned to Woodsbend on 28 May 49, where he was buried in Flatwoods Cemetery. g). He was 35 years old at time of his death.  He had been married for 10 years, and was the father of three children. He taught school in Morgan County, Kentucky for 12 years.  He is the subject of two books written by his son, Tom Ratliff, 190 Ethelrob Circle, Carlisle, Ohio 45005-6221. The first book, I Can Hear The Guns Now, has all of his letters home in it, 42 of them were written at Camp Fannin.  The second book, Now I Know - A War Orphan's Journey of Discovery, describes what really happened to him.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

RAY, Howell Travis, Pvt. a) Ennis, Texas. b) B/51/11, 1944. c) 21 June 1944, Camp Fannin Station Hospital. d) B/51/11 (Fannin). e) Died from heat exhaustion. Although Howell Travis Ray died within a week after the infamous 15 June 1944 "death march" at Fannin, and deaths from heat during the march were reported, it does not appear that Pvt. Ray took part in the "death march". His regiment, the 11th, did not participate in the march. He had been at Fannin only three weeks, and if he was a trainee, he would not have been marching that distance so early in his basic. g) Ruby Jean Neilson, former CFA corresponding secretary and widow of Gordon Neilson, our late former president.

 

 

RAY, John Raymond, PFC, 38573265. a) Oklahoma. b) C/64/13. c) 24 March 1945, France. d) 357/90. e) Stanton: The 90th Division assaulted across the Moselle River in the Kattenes-Moselkern region 14 March 1945, and attacked across the Nahe River 19 March 1945 to capture Mainz on 22 March 1945. It crossed the Rhine 24 March 1945 f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot C, Row 31, Grave 60. g) Donna Howe, niece, dcrhowe@comcast.net. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

REED, Gilbert O., Pvt., 44046472. a) Mississippi. c) 12 April 1945, Philippine Islands. d) 182/Americal. e) Stanton: The Americal Division left Leyte 24 Mar. 45, and after a one-hour naval bombardment, the division landed at Talisay Cebu and took Cebu City the next day. The 182nd Inf. Regt. fought the Battle of Go Chan Hill 28-29 Mar. 45 and then battled to clear the other hills, being counterattacked heavily on Bolo Ridge 1 Apr. 45. The division fought the Battle of Babay Ridge 12-17 Apr. 45.  f) Manila American Cemetery, Philippines, Plot B, Row 9, Grave 157. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

REED, William Hayward, 38482319. a) Coffeeville/Ore City, Texas. b) Dec. 43-Spring 44. c) 10 Jan. 45, France. d) 3rd Bn/314/79. e) Stanton: The 79th Division fought the Battle of Haguenau 9-11 Dec. 44 and reached the Lauter River at Schiebenhardt on 15 Dec. 44 and held defensive lines at Wissembourg until 2 Jan. 45. It then moved to the southern portion of the Rhine River and by 6 Jan. 45 the division had battled through Stattmatten to relieve encircled elements of the task force. German attacks defeated 314th Inf. efforts to take Drusenheim, and by 12 Jan. 45 both 14th Armd. Div. and 103rd Inf. Div. were committed to the battle.   f) Buried Epinal, France, but after three years, on 29 April 48, body was sent home for burial in the Coffeeville Cemetery, Coffeeville, Texas. g) Niece, CFA Member Millie Jean Purgerson, Greenville, Texas, who composed a beautiful tribute to her uncle which she delivered at our 1998 reunion (see page 8, Spring 1998 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon). h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

.

RHODES, Gale L., Corporal, 36864512, DOB  1920.  a)  Peoria, Illinois.  b)  1943, 481st MP Escort Guard Company.  c)  14 October 1943, Camp Fannin, Texas.  d)  481st MP Escort Guard Company.  e)  Circumstances of death not  known.  f)  Golden Gate National Cemetery, San Bruno, California, Section L, Block 2, Site 6238.  g)  Shane Olson, Adjutant, 9th District Sons of American Legion, 216 Railroad Avenue South, Halma, Minnesota 56729-2908, who learned of his death while researching for soldiers  from his area killed during the war.  h)  Headstone shows Michigan though Illinois was specified.  Posted  5 March 2014            

RICHARDSON, Fred M., Sr., Pvt., 44031646. a) Alabama. c) 15 March 45, Germany. d) 30/3. e) Stanton:  The 3rd Div. renewed its offensive against the Colmar [Alsace, France] Pocket on 26 Jan. 45 and crossed the Canal de Colmar on 29 Jan. 45. At the end of the month it took Horbourg and was at the outskirts of Colmar. 30th Inf. entered Germany 13 Mar. 45 f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot C, Row 23, Grave 73. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

RIDER, Hollis M., Pvt., 37694938, DOB 2/9/1918. a) Garwin, Iowa. b) April-September 1944, C/83/15. c) 27 November 1944, near Kriegsheim, north of Strasbourg, France. d) K/315/79. e) "Company K was attacking the town of Kriegsheim, France. It was a clear day and his company was bravely advancing towards the enemy. The enemy began firing on them with machine gun and rifle fire. At 2 p.m. he was caught in a burst of machine gun fire." (letter from his daughter). Stanton: The 79th Division took Embermenil 3 October 1944 and battled for the high ground east of the town 15-22 October and was relieved in this area 23 October. It rested at Luneville and returned to the attack 13 November with the 314th and 315th Regiments out of the Montigny area which carried it across the Vezousse with the capture of Fremonville 19 November. It consolidated north of Strasbourg 25 November and began the assault on Haguenau. f) U. S. Military Cemetery, Epinal, France; permanent burial Garwin, Iowa. g) Daughter, Judy Rider Woodbury, 8580 E. Sells Drive, Scottsdale, Arizona 85251, mj2511az@cox.net, 480-945-3180. "If anyone knew my father," she asks, "please contact me."  Also, son, Ralph James Rider, Murfreesboro, Tennessee.  See also Nick Russ' entry in this Roll of Honor.  h)  Age at death, 26 years, 10 months.  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

RIEVLEY, Paul A., Private, 37644041. a) Missouri. b) 23 October 1944-3 February 1945, D/51/11. c) 28 March 1945, placeof death unknown but possibly at an Army general hospital in England following evacuation from Germany. d) Company K, 301st Infantry Regiment, 94th Infantry Division. e) Died of wounds sustained March 15 in the vicinity of Heddart, Germany.  He was taken to an aid station, treated and sent to a hospital where he died March 28.  He was wounded in actions described thus by Stanton: The division crossed the Ruwer River by ford and bridge on 13 March to attack out of the bridgehead and by 16 March had broken through to the Hermeskiel-Nonnweiler line. f) Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England, Plot B, Row 2, Grave 24. g) Daughter, Kay Armstrong, 430 Neunaber Drive, Bethalto, Illinois 62010; Michael Butler, Mrs. Armstrong’s son-in-law. Mrs. Armstrong pleas "If anyone knew or remembers my father Paul A. Rievley at Camp Fannin or in the 94th Division, or anywhere else, would you please contact me at <Buffy_430@hotmail.com> ?  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. At the end of basic training at Camp Fannin, he was presented with a Certificate of Performance stating that “he has passed with merit the requirements of this Regiment’s Non-Commissioned Officer’s School”, which means that he likely would have gone to Cadre School at Fannin, except that at the time he completed basic, there was a dire need for infantry replacements in the European Theater of Operations following losses in the Battle of the Bulge.
 

RISCH, Marvin D., Pvt.  a)  Elkton, South Dakota.  b) 1943.  c)  15 March 1945, vicinity Colmar, France.  d)  3rd Infantry Division.  e)  Stanton: The Third Infantry Division began its attack toward the Maginot Line on 5 December 1944 and cleared Bennwihr 24 December 1944, after which it was relieved by the 28th Infantry Division.  The division renewed its offensive against the Colmar Pocket on 26 January 1945 and crossed the Canal de Colmar on 29 January 1944, then took Horbourg and was on the outskirts of Colmar.  It assaulted the West Wall Line 18 March 1945f)  U. S. Military Cemetery St. Avold, France, Plot A, Row 8, Grave 89; reinterred at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Section C, Block 3, Grave 7951.  g) Hannah Drexler, Kariann Lien, and Derek Wooters, 8th Grade, Brandon Valley Middle School, Brandon, South Dakota.  For further information, see <http://www.state.sd.us/military/Vet Affairs/sdwwiimemorial/SubPages/profiles/Display.asp?P=1608> . h) Marvin Risch volunteered and was inducted on August 23, 1944, three weeks after news that his older brother Emery had been killed in action with the 15th U. S. Army Air Force in Italy.  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

RODGERS, Wilson F., PFC, 39209620. a) Washington State. b) July-Oct. 43, B/68/14. c) 16 Nov. 44, Alsace, France. d) K/409/103. e) Killed attacking machine gun position, for which he received the Distinguished Service Cross. e) Stanton:  The 103rd Div. arrived at Marseille, France on 20 Oct. 44 and relieved the 3rd Inf. Div. at Chevry 8-9 Nov. 44. It attacked toward St. Die in the Vosges Mountains 16 Nov. 44 and fought through strong opposition to clear the hill mass below the town.  f) American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot B, Row 17, Grave 60. g) Harold O. Rorem, 4112 Janet Lane, Brooklyn Center, Minnesota 55429, in the same company and platoon at Fannin, and roommate during ASTP at Texas A&M. "Friends in 103rd told me shortly after his death."   h) Distinguished Service Cross (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

RODMAN, John S., Pvt., 33925294. a) Pennsylvania. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, D/64/13. c) 28 May 45. d) 71/44. f)Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

RODRIAN, Roland G., 2nd Lt., O-1052136. b) 1943, Pay and Records Section, BIRTC. d) 76th Inf. Div. g) Percy C. Menning, 57 Fox Point Drive, Appleton, Wisconsin 54911, a staff sergeant in the Pay and Records Section May 43-March 44. Also a Section member, the late Harley Errett, a warrant officer and husband of CFA Corresponding Secretary Viola Errett.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

ROSEBERRY, Walter F., PFC, 37721699.  a)  Sedgwick County, Kansas.  b) Sept. 43-Jan. 44, C/67/14. d) 1/6. g) Kenneth L. Rigby, 104 E. 19th St., Hays, Kansas 67601-3218, in the same company at Fannin, from 6th Div. list of casualties.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

ROSENBAUM, Chester L., S/Sgt., 37003727.  a)  Cedar County, Missouri. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666

 

ROSENQVIST, Mark D., 37568014. a) Nerstrand, Minnesota. b) July-Oct. 43, B/68/14. c) 1944, France. d) Hq. Co., 23rd Tank Bn., 12th Armd. Div.,  tank driver. f) Nerstrand, Minnesota. g) Harold O. Rorem, 4112 Janet Lane, Brooklyn Center, Minnesota 55429, in the same company and platoon at Fannin, and roommate during ASTP at Texas A&M. Learned of Mark’s death through mutual friends in 12th Armd. "I visited his parents after the war."  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

ROSS, Fred C. , Jr., PFC, 18214622.  a) Ft. Worth, Texas. b) A/66/14, July-Oct. 1943. c) 16 November 1944, near St. Die in Vosges Mountains.  d)  409/103.   e)  Stanton:  The 103rd Infantry Division arrived at Marseille, France on 20 October 1944 and relieved the 3rd Infantry Division at Chevry 8-9 November 1944.  It attacked toward St. Die in the Vosges Mountains 16 November 1944  and fought through strong opposition to clear the hill mass below the town.   f)  Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France, Plot A, Row 35, Grave 3.  g) Charlie E. Seyster, Col., USAF Ret., 205 Shoreline Drive, Malakoff, Texas 75148. Col. Seyster and Fred Ross were in college together at Texas A&M before induction, trained together at Fannin, then were in ASTP together at Texas Tech. When ASTP folded, Fred Ross was shipped to an infantry division at Camp Howze, Texas and Col. Seyster to Engineer OCS at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia. Further information provided by  Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

ROY, John David, Pvt., 35083632, DOB March 20, 1911.  a) Chicago, Illinois  b) May-September 1944  c) March 16, 1945, Frorath, Germany, east of the Rhine between Bonn and Koblenz  d) G/2/393/99  e) Killed by friendly fire, artillery laid down short of enemy target, shrapnel wound in back. Stanton: The 99th crossed the Rhine at Remagen March 10-11 and took over the southern flank of the bridgehead, withstanding counterattacks and expanding it through the Honnigen Wall into Honnigen which fell after heavy combat by March 16.  f) Henri-Chapelle American Military Cemetery, Belgium, Plot D, Row 4, Grave 60.  g) son, Tom Roy, 541 Evans, Missoula, Montana 59801, <tomandsue@bresnan.net>.  h) Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

RUSS, Nick. b)  April-September 1944, C/83/15.  c)  December 1944.  Nick trained with Hollis M. Rider, who was also killed in action, on November 27, 1944. We have no further information on Nick Russ and will greatly appreciate any information you can provide.  Hollis M. Rider’s wife Betty  prepared a scrapbook for her two children, who were four and almost two at the time of his death, which had a notation under Nick Russ’ picture that he was killed in action December 1944.  Hollis M. Rider’s daughter, Judy Rider Woodbury, provided the information on both of the men.  Her address is 8580 E. Sells Drive, Scottsdale, Arizona 85251; mj2511az@cox.net480-945-3180.  See also Hollis M. Rider’s entry in this Roll of Honor.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

RYAN, James Kirby. a) Seattle, Washington. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, B/63/13. c) Fall 1944, ETO. g) Leo S. Jensen, 195 Horseshoe Circle, Athens, Georgia 30605, in same company at Fannin.

 

 

We add names of Camp Fannin veterans who died in uniform during World War II and make corrections continuously to our Roll of Honor as new information is provided. If you have personal knowledge of the death in uniform of someone else who served at Camp Fannin, please nominate him or her for membership in the Camp Fannin Roll of Honor. Write to Roll of Honor, 2213 Mendoza Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32304-1319 requesting a nomination form or e-mail your request to ethorne003@comcast.net. This version updated  11 November 2014

 

 

01/15/2016

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