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Roll of Honor

 

S-Z

Camp Fannin, Texas
Infantry Replacement Training Center
U.S. Army, 1943-46

ROLL OF HONOR (S through Z)  of Fannin Veterans who died in uniform during World War II.

All gave some, but some gave all.
(Courtesy of Mrs. Wilmer Carol Jumper Mercer, daughter of Isaac Wilmer Jumper)


Men and women who died in the service of their country during World War II who had been stationed at Camp Fannin, Texas. Available information is identified by the following alphabetical code:

a) hometown or state;
b) dates and unit at Camp Fannin;
c) date and place of death;
d) unit assignment at time of death;
e) circumstances of death;
f) places of burial (temporary and permanent);
g) name and relationship of person(s) submitting information;
h) miscellaneous information (awards, age at death, etc.)


Shelby Stanton’s reference work, Order of Battle, U.S. Army, World War II, is especially helpful in providing supplemental information for expanded profiles of men and women who died in the service of their country during World War II who had been stationed at Camp Fannin Texas. Specifically, its combat narratives enable us to locate a given unit on a given date and describe the action it was involved in. Stanton’s references when used appear in entry e) in the expanded profiles, “circumstances of death” and are cited thus: e) Stanton: “…”. For a copy of a division's complete combat narrative as reported in Stanton, send a stamped,  self-addressed envelope to Camp Fannin Roll of Honor, 2213 Mendoza Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32304. Test 4  February 2016


Sacco through Zeigler

Men and women who died in the service of their country during World War II who had been stationed at Camp Fannin, Texas. Available information is identified by the following alphabetical code: a) hometown or state; b) dates and unit at Camp Fannin; c) date and place of death; d) unit assignment at time of death; e) circumstances of death; f) places of burial (temporary and permanent); g) name and relationship of person(s) submitting information; h) miscellaneous information (awards, age at death, etc.) Updated 11 November 2014.

 

SACCO,  Ignatius N., Pvt.  a)  Santa Clara, California  b) completed basic 12 February 1944, 54th Bn., 11th Regt.  c)  5 July 1944, near Beau Coudray, Normandy, France. d)  B/357/90  e)  KIA enemy artillery shell fragment.  Stanton:  The 90th Infantry Division's 359th Regiment attached to the 4th Infantry Division assaulted Utah Beach, France on 6 June 1944,  The remainder of the division including the 357th Regiment attacked 10 June 1944 and the  division halted in the Golleville-Urville  area 17 June 1944 after heavy combat.  On 3 July 1944, advancing in heavy rain, the division attacked south down the west coast of the Contentin Peninsula and fought the battle of La Haye-du-Puits-Mont Castre Forest 6-10 July 1944.   f)  Santa Clara Catholic Cemetery, Santa Clara, California.    g)  Catherine Sacco, grandniece, katiesacco82@hotmail.com.  h)  Ignatius Sacco's uniform shows that at some point he was a sergeant in some other military organization.  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

SAIKI, Masami d) L/100/442 RCT (Nisei).

 

 

 

SANTORE, William, Pvt.  c) 11 May 45, Okinawa. g) Mrs. Earl (Katherine A.) Park, 12821 McGowan Drive, Tyler, Texas 75707-9665, from 1946 Rayen Annual, Youngstown, Ohio, Dedication Biographies.

 

 

SAPPINGTON, John H., Pvt., 36682085. a) Chicago, Illinois. b) Aug.-Nov. 43, D/63/13. c) 17 December 1944,  near Elsenborn Ridge, Belgium.  d) I/393/99. e) from Dauntless: A History of the 99th Infantry Division, by William C. C. Cavanagh: "When Kampfgruppe Muller forced the 3rd Bn. to yield ground, two platoons of Company I, 393rd Infantry joined with Company M to regain the lost ground. They were unable to regain it and were barely able to hold their own in the face of enemy tanks. Four bazooka teams moved forward. A Panther closed on the Company M command post and shot up the Company M mess tent. Staff Sergeant Chester E. Kroll, a section leader with the 2nd Heavy Machine Gun Platoon of Company M, witnessed the clash with the Panther: ‘A Tiger [the Panther] tank crept up on us and fired point blank. One of our guns opened up on the tank and buttoned it up and knocked out some of the infantry that followed. The gun was manned by Private Sappington and Private Stallman. The tank scored a lucky hit on our machine gun, killing Sappington. Stallman survived without a scratch.’  Stanton:  The 99th Infantry Division landed at Le Havre, France on 3 November 1944 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 November 1944.  After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 December 1944 against heavy resistance from the West Wall.  On 16 December 1944 the German Ardennes Counteroffensive hit the division which was partially surounded and suffered heavy losses before Elsenborn Ridge.  f)  Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot F, Row 1, Grave 63. g) Leon W. St. Pierre, 3325 Bain Place, Tyler, Texas 75701-8871, in the same company at Fannin and in combat with the 99th at the same time.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

SAVARD, Godfrey J., 2nd Lt., 01688296 a) Quebec, Canada; entered Army from Connecticut. b) Not known; information states only that he served at Camp Fannin. c) October 22, 1945, Leghorn (Livorno), Italy. d) 703rd Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company. e) No information provided; served 16 months heavy combat with A/339/85, promoted from private to tech sergeant in a year, then commissioned. He was then reassigned to the 703rd when 85th rotated home at the end of the war. f) American Cemetery, Florence, Italy, Plot C, Row 3, Grave 9. g) Source of information: <http://www.geocities.com/carl123.geo/soldats.html>  and American Battle Monuments Commission. h) Awards: Silver Star Medal (left), two Bronze Stars, French Croix d’Guerre with palm, Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

SCHENKEL, Emil H. c) Killed in Suchtein during the Rhine offensive.  f) American Military Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  Posted 3 February 2016.  More information to come.

SCHUESSLER, Frank A., PFC, 33925290. a)  Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.  b)  Sept-Dec 1944, 58/12. g)  Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, a fellow-trainee at Fannin. 

 

 

SCHWARTZ, Raymond A., Private, 37598537.  d)  K/126/32.  Additional information pending.

 

SCOTT, Charles F., S/Sgt. a) California. c) 15 Nov. 44, Ancerville, France. d) F/315/79 e) Stanton: An all-out divisional assault forced a German withdrawal from the Foret de Parroy with the final capture of the road on the main road junction 9 Oct. 44. The division next took Embermenil 3 Oct. 44 and battled for the high ground east of the town 15-22 Oct. 44. It was relieved in this area 24 Oct.44. It rested at Luneville and returned to the attack 13 Nov. 44 with the 314th and 315th out of the Montigny area which carried it across the Vezouse.  g) Edgar W. Henley (now deceased), Route 1, Box 66A, Emmet, Arkansas 71835, who wrote: "I was first sergeant of Co. F when S/Sgt. Scott was killed."  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

SCOTT, James Dryden. b) late 1943 or early 1944. c) He was killed in Europe during the crossing of the Rhine. He was a glider infantryman. f) U. S. Military Cemetery, Margraten, Holland. g) son, James D. Scott, Jr., 938 South Alamo Road, #1, Alamo, Texas 78516-9521. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

SERSHA, John Paul, Private, 37580467  a) Leonidas (Leoneth), Minnesota.  b)  January-May (?), 1944,  D/56/12.  c)  27 September 1944, Kiekberg Forest near Groesbeek, Holland.  d) Co. F/325th Glider Inf. Regt./82nd Airborne Div.  e)  In Operation Market Garden (17-25 September 1944), the 325th Glider Infantry Regiment was towed on 23 September to the Netherlands with landing zones near Overasselt.  Originally the 325th was to be towed  on the third day of operation, but due to the weather, they were delayed until the 23rd.  On 27 September, in an attack on Kiekberg Forest,  John Sersha became missing in action.  His body was never recovered and he was officially declared killed in action on 27 September.  The Market Garden Operation is the subject of the film  A Bridge Too Far.  g) Richard A. Lohry, nephew, 9181 Pihlaja Road, Angora, Minnesota 55703-8249 who provided the following additional information on 12 November 2014:

 

John became MIA on his first combat mission in the Market Garden Operation. He was declared KIA in 1945.  His remains were not recovered and his name is on the Wall Of Remembrance in the Margraten Military Cemetery in the Netherlands, However, last November, the day after installing a memorial paver in the Virginia, Minnesota War Memorial with John’s name, etc., I was contacted by Mr. Danny Keay in Germany. He is semi-retired from the army and is a military archaeologist. In going over X Files and also IDPF files he discovered that John’s remains may have been found in 1948. They are now buried in a numbered grave in Neuville, Belgium [Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial]. I am currently trying to obtain an exhumation order for DNA analysis. John’s brother Paul and I have submitted DNA samples to the military lab. I have copies of the files and it appears that the forensic evidence, and especially the circumstantial evidence warrants the exhumation order. If in fact a positive ID is made, the remains will be reburied with full military honors at any cemetery in the world. I am hoping that this takes place while his remaining older brother Paul, now 95, is still alive.

 

SHERMAN, Nathan Gilbert, PFC, 33664113. a) Cross Keys, Virginia. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 11 Feb. 45, Germany. d) C/318/80. e) Stanton: After massive artillery preparation, the 80th Division attacked across the Our and Sauer on 7 Feb. 45 with the 319th Inf. at Wallendorf and the 318th near Dillingen. The heavy fire from the West Wall positions and swift current combined to prevent any bridging. As the West Wall fortifications and pillboxes were slowly reduced the bridgehead was expanded. f) Luxembourg American Cemetery; reinterred St. Paul’s Cemetery, Grottoes, Virginia. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, who trained in the same company at Fannin, and offers a roster including Nathan Sherman’s name. See page 3, February 2003 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

SHEWCRAFT, Herman C., PFC, 35815761. a) Kentucky. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 29 April 45, Germany. d) 71/44. e) Stanton: "On 25 April 45 … the 71st Inf. Regt. crossed the Iller at Dietenheim and cleared Voehringen. The 44th Div. then followed the 10th Armd. Div. and cleared Fuessen and Wertach on 28 April 45…and rushed through the Fern Pass and entered the Inn Valley. f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot E, Row 21, Grave 34. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666, who trained in the same company at Fannin, and offers a roster including Herman Shewcraft’s name. See page 3, February 2003 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

SHOUSE,  James Aubrey, PFC, date of birth May 30, 1925.  a)  Dublin, Virginia.  b)  Fall 1943.  c)  September 12, 1944, France.  f)  New Dublin Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Dublin, Virginia. g)  Shane Olson, Adjutant, 9th District Sons of American Legion, 216 Railroad Avenue South, Halma, Minnesota 56729-2908, who learned of his death while researching for soldiers   killed during the war.  h)  Entered the Army September 4, 1943, trained at Camp Fannin and Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, Served in Italy and France.  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

SIEK, Leonard O., PFC, 35845850, DOB 2/6/1919.  a)  Pemberville, Ohio.  b)  July-November 1944, B/66/14.  c)  March 17, 1945, Luzon, near Norton's Knob. d) H/27/25.  e) Stanton:  The 25th Division redeployed to La Paz and prepared to assault the Caraballo Mountains.  The offensive was initiated 21 Feb. 45 as the division drove up Highway 5 toward Balete Pass.  On 15 Mar. 45 the division began the battle for Norton's Knob where entrenche d Japanese repulsed attacks for the next ten days.   f) Re-buried 8/18/1948 in New Albany National Cemetery, Ind., Sect. F, Site 129. g) Paul Rolf, a hometown friend, who was inducted with Leonard, trained with him at Camp Fannin, and fought with him on Luzon. “As I went through his company when my recon troop was relieved,” Paul writes, “I asked about him and was told he was killed in the battle leading to the Congo Fortress.”  Additional information from Shane Olson, Halma, Minn., and Patricia M. Hock, Kentucky National Cemetery Complex. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

SIMS, Ralph D., Jr., PFC, 18169673. a) Hazen, Arkansas. b) Fall 1943, D/66/14. c) 18 Nov. 44, approaches to Metz, France. d) 2/5   e)  Stanton:  On 12 Nov. 1944, the 5th Infantry Division returned to the assault on Metz and was counterattacked at once as it entered the bridgehead of the 6th Armd. Div. Over the next few days, the 2nd Inf. took Ancerville.  f)  Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot C, Row 28, Grave 59.   g) Mrs. Kim Groff, 6414 Shoreline Drive, Little Elm, Texas 75068, phone (972) 294-8160, e-mail <kgroff@sbcglobal,net>. Mrs. Groff is author of The Fitzgerald House, which memorializes the home at 815 South Broadway Avenue in Tyler where Mrs. Lois Whiteman welcomed so many Fannin service men during the war. Mrs. Groff discovered letters to Mrs. Whiteman from many whom she had befriended including Ralph D. Sims, Jr. Many of his letters appear in her book, including a final one dated 12 Nov. 44, saying "It’s cold here, and those big feet of mine just can’t seem to stay warm. Otherwise, I’m fine."   Additional information provided in July 2009 by Shane Olson of Halma, Minnesota.  h) Excerpts from his obituary in the Hazen paper: "Ralph was a graduate of Hazen High School and president and valedictorian of the class of 1940.  He graduated from Arkansas State Teachers College with a BS in chemistry, was president of the student council and of his freshman class and was listed in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges.  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

SMITH, George A., Pvt., 36486831.  a)  Midland, Michigan.  b)  Fall 1944.  c)  26 April  1945, Crump’s Hill, near the barrio Kapintalan,  Luzon, Philippines.  d) F/161/25th “Tropic Lightning” Division.  e)  Killed during 161st Regiment’s advance along Highway 5 toward Balete Pass. Because  of heavy fighting and difficult mountain jungle conditions, his body wasn’t recovered for two weeks, about the time American forces closed in to take the pass on 13 May 1945.  f)  Midland, Michigan.  g)  Randolph D. Brandt,  brandt.randolph@gmail.com, (262) 681-9361, 3429 North Main Street, Racine, Wisconsin 53402.   h)  From a letter from  Randy Brandt, husband  of Bonnie J. Hollis, niece of George A. Smith, “George Smith’s service and death  remain an important part of family memory and traditions.  My  wife’s father Thomas J. Smith  flew an American flag in his yard every day in honor of his brother up until his own death in 1995 and we’ve continued  the practice to this day.”  Purple Heart and Combat Infantry Badge.     Updated 11 May 2011.

 

 

SMITH, Jack. a) Dallas, Texas. b) July-Nov 43, B/63/13. c) Leyte, Philippine Islands, Oct or Nov 44. d) A/718 Amph Tractor Bn., attached to 77th Inf Div. e) Made the initial assault on Leyte, killed by enemy fire while on patrol.  The 718th Amphibian Tractor Battalion took part in the raids deep behind Japanese lines on Leyte in late 1944 and early 1945.   g) William J. Reilly, 93 Park Ave., Unit 1504, Danbury, Connecticut 06810, friend from Camp Fannin who served in the same unit overseas.  Additional information provided by Shane Olson, Halma, Minnesota.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

SMITH, Rufus, Pvt., 36882849. a) Michigan.  b) October 1943-?  c)  11 September 1944, vicinity Aachen, Germany.  d)  18th Inf. Regt., 1st Inf. Div.  e)  Stanton: The 1st Inf. Div. crossed the Meuse River at Liege, Belgium 9 September 1944, reached the German border, and laid siege to the fortress-city of Aachen.  f)  Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Belgium, Plot E, Row 15, Grave 28.  g)  Great-greatniece, at jenntatro@cox.net. h) Silver Star Medal (left), Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

 SNOOK, Ivan J., Pfc, 37678681. a) Newton, Iowa. b) A/67/14, finished training February 1944. c) 3 April 1945, Luzon. d) 158 (Bushmasters)/Separate. e) Stanton:  Attached to 11th Airborne Division 3-24 March 1945, began offensive to open Balayan and Batangas Bays on 5 March 1945, and after heavy combat, cleared the Calumpan Peninsula by 16 March 1945; attached to the XIV Corps 25 March, assaulted Legaspi area of Bicol Peninsula, Luzon 1 April 1945 and battled for ridge near Daraga 1-9 April 1945.  g) Robert G. Myers, 917 South 2nd Ave. W, Newton, Iowa 50208, who trained in the same battalion at Fannin.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

SPAGNA, Dominick B. f) American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  Posted 3 February 2016.  More information to come.

SPEESE, Andrew Jackson III, Private, 38544452, date of birth  8/10/12. a) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. b) 27 October 1943-March 1944, D/68/14. c) 6 July 1944, Beaucoudray (Le Plessis-Lastelle), Normandy, France.  d) Co. K/3rd Bn/357th Inf. Regt./90th Inf. Div. e) Andrew Jackson Speese III joined his unit on June 14, 1944; subsequent action is described thus: Stanton:   The division halted in the Golleville-Urville 90th ID Tough Hombresarea 17 June after heavy combat and took up defensive positions. Advancing in heavy rain, the division attacked 3 July south  down the west coast of the Cotentin Peninsula and fought the battle of La Haye-du-Puits-Mont Castre Forest 6-10 July. The action which cost Andrew Jackson Speese III his life was a part of the formidable “battle of the hedgerows” in the earliest days following D-Day.  He died of a penetrating head wound and traumatic amputation of an arm caused by artillery shell fragments. f) First buried at "les Forges", Blosville, France, then at  Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, Plot F, Row 21, Grave 36.  g) His son, Andrew Jackson Speese, Jr., 1105 Lunaanela St., Kailua, Honolulu County, Hawaii 96734. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  He was functioning as platoon sergeant at the time of his death.  There is a statue of Andrew Jackson Speese III in Periers, France as part of a memorial to the 90th Infantry Division.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. 

STARR, Donald R. d) Member of the 3rd Battalion, 401st Glider Infantry Regiment, which served as the 3rd Battalion of the 325th GIR, 82nd Airborne Division. f) American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  Posted 3 February 2016.  More information to come.

 

 

STOCKING, Alvin E., 2nd Lt., 0-520266, DOB November 8, 1921.  a) Hettinger, Adams County, North Dakota.   b)  July 1943 to June 1944, Platoon Leader, 3rd Platoon, Co. B, 81st Bn.  c) 2 December 1944, vicinity St. Hippolyte, France.  d)  Co. F, 142nd Inf. Regt., 36th Inf. Div.  e)  After 11 months  as a platoon leader at Camp Fannin, Lt. Stocking arrived in France from Italy in late October 1944 as a replacement officer for the 36th Infantry Division, assigned to Co F, 142nd Inf. Regt.  He was killed by a gunshot wound as the Germans counterattacked after his unit had assisted in liberation of the town of St. Hippolyte, France.   Stanton:  The 36th Infantry Division crossed the Meurthe River at St. Leonard and Clefcy 21 November.  After encountering strong opposition the division breached the Ste. Marie Pass to the Alsatian Plains on 25 November and cleared Selestat 4 December. f)  U. S. Military Cemetery, Epinal, France; re-interred September 1948 at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Section B-1, Site 380-N.  g)  Dean W. Erickson, nephew,  Bismarck, North Dakota 58503-6125, who states "As a young child in the late 1950s I was told that my Uncle Alvin had died in France during World War II.  I'd like to thank my nephew who enlightened us on events that took place so long ago, via his travels to St. Hippolyte, France and by acquiring relevant military records. Shane Olson also provided information.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge. Reconstructed  4 March 2015.   

 

                                         

 

 

STROUSE, Liston, Pvt. c) 18 June 45, Luzon, P.I. d) L/148/37. e) Killed by machine gun fire while attacking a Japanese strong point. g) Don Ely, RR 1, Cornell, Illinois 61319-9801. Don says he did not know deceased but that they were in the same company, probably in another platoon. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

SWANN, Ferdinand R., Pvt. a) Doniphan, Missouri. b) D/52/11. c) 22 June 44, France. d) B/23/2. e) Stanton: The 2nd Div. landed on the evening of 7 June 44 across Omaha Beach and was committed in the Foret de Cerisy and next attacked across the Elle and Aure Rivers. It assaulted the German strongpoint position on top of Hill 192 which commanded the approaches to St. Lo on 12 June 44. Fierce fighting for Hill 192 continued through June. f) Normandy American Cemetery. g) Howard H. Hoblet, 6628 Tully-Harrison Road, Convoy, Ohio 45832, company clerk D/52/11 both at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and Camp Fannin. Learned of deceased’s death from Letter 4, dated Jan. 1, 1945, sent out to former members of D/52/11 by John B. Culbertson, then stationed in Ft. Meade, Md. Further information from Ferdinand R. Swann’s grand niece, Tanya Banderman, tjband@msn.com.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 



SWISHER, Robert Benjamin, Pvt. a) Kirksville, Missouri. b) Aug. 44-Jan. 45. c) 28 April 45, Luzon, P.I. f) Greencastle Cemetery, Green City, Missouri. g) Walter D. Straight, 3101 S. Route O, Columbia, Missouri 65203-9281, who writes: "The Swisher boys, Carroll and Robert, are cousins. They were inducted together, trained in the same company at Camp Fannin, home on leave together Christmas 1944, went overseas together, both severely wounded together, in same hospital, where Robert died."  h) 
 Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

TAYLOR, Robert R., Cpl., 38545302. a) Corrigan, Texas. b) Winter-Spring 1944, D/62/13, transferred in April 1944 to A/56/12. c) 7 August 1944, Anzo, France. d) 110/28. e) Stanton: "The 28th Infantry Division landed in Normandy, France on 22 July 1944 and entered the hedgerow struggle north and west of St. Lo. Advancing slowly against determined German defenders, it took Percy 1 August 1944 and overran Gathemo with 2nd Armored Division assistance on 10 August 1944."  f) U. S. Military Cemetery, Le Chene-Guerin, 14 miles south of St. Lo, Plot E, Row 6, Grave 113. Repatriated and buried on or about 29 April 1949 at Union Springs Cemetery, Corrigan (Polk County), Texas. g) Niece, Joyce Mosley, 6103 Egypt, Pasadena, Texas 77505, garyjoyce925@hotmail.com. h) Mrs. Mosley, three years old at the time of her uncle’s death, says "I remember my mother receiving a late-night telegram and sitting down on the side of the bed and crying. I remember going to Robert’s funeral after his body was returned to Corrigan, Texas."   Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

TEN KLEY, Wilmer. f) American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. g) Terry Hirsch, Indianapolis, Indiana.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.  Posted 3 February 2016.  More information to come.

 

TENLEY, William H. a) Iowa. c) 1944, Leyte, P.I. f) Stanwood, Iowa. g) Mrs. Janet Taylor, Kilgore, Texas, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Werner of Tyler, transmitted by Mrs. Ruby Neilson, Gordon’s widow, 417 Bond St., Hillsboro, Texas 76645-2332. Ruby writes: "Mrs. Taylor got hold of guest register from the First Baptist Church, Tyler, signed during the war, and began to try to track the signees. She took the state of Iowa as her project. She had really fantastic results. The people of Iowa are so helpful and friendly. Some of the newspapers, Chambers of Commerce, country clerks, etc. wrote to say that they knew some of the veterans, including William H. Tenley, were deceased." See also story about Mrs. Taylor in Camp Fannin Guidon, Spring 1997 issue, page 2, "God Bless The Children".

 

 

THOMAS, Carl, Pvt. b) Aug-Dec 43, A/81. c) 20 Oct 44, Leyte, P.I. g) Eric Diller, 504 Via La Selva, Redondo Beach, CA 90277; (310) 375-2024; eddiller@earthlink.net; in same barracks with deceased at Camp Fannin. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

THOMAS, Raymond P., Sgt., 31389683. a) Massachusetts. b) D/52/11. c) 18 Dec. 44, France. d) 30/3. e) Stanton: The 3rd Div. emerged from the Vosges onto the Alsatian Plain and entered Strasbourg 27 Nov. 44. On 5 Dec. 44 the division began its attack toward the Maginot Line and cleared Bennwihr 24 Dec. 44.   f) Epinal American Cemetery, France, Plot B, Row 41, Grave 1. g) Howard H. Hoblet, 6628 Tully-Harrison, Convoy, Ohio 45832, company clerk D/52/11 both at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and Camp Fannin. Learned of Raymond Thomas’s death from Letter 4, dated 1 Jan. 45, sent out to former members of D/52/11 by John B. Culbertson, then stationed at Ft. Meade, Md.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge

 

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TIEMANN, Edgar B. ("Boots"). b) March-Sept. 44. c) 17 April 45, Tanne, Germany. d) L/3/16/1. e) Excerpts from letter from daughter, Patricia Tiemann Fabri: "He was wounded in the Battle of Hurtgen Forest on 23 Nov. 44, sent to England for surgery and rehabilitation and back to his unit in March 45." Stanton: On 8 April 45 the 1st Division was called up to force the Weser River after the 3rd Armd Div had reached it only to find all the bridges blown. The 16th and 18th Infantry Regiments expanded the bridgehead . With the 4th Cavalry Group attached, the division was tasked with mopping up along the edge of the Harz Mountains. The bypassed German troops were encircled commencing 12 April 45 and organized resistance ended by 20 April 45. g) Daughter, Patricia Tiemann Fabri, 3715 W. Calavar Rd., Phoenix, Arizona 85053. h) Deceased was 32 at time of death. Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

TINKER, Eugene, Pvt., 31401988. a) Maine. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 26 Feb. 45, Luxembourg. d) I/304/76. e) Stanton: "The [76th] Div. crossed the Pruem River 24-25 Feb. 45 and regrouped, as the 304th Inf. Regt. crossed the Nims at Wolsfeld the next day." f) Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Plot E, Row 15, Grave 66. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

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TROTTER, George I. ("GI"). a) Iowa. b) C/64/13. c) Aug. 44, Italy. g) Edgar W. Henley, Route 1, Box 66A, Emmet, Arkansas 71835. Edgar and "GI" were fellow cadremen in C/64/13, along with another Roll of Honor hero, Wayne W. Dahlstedt. The three are shown together in a 1944 photo, printed on page 3 of the Fall 1999 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

 

 

TUCKER, Raymond J., PFC, 35907914. a) Indiana. b) Sept.-Dec. 44, C/64/13 and C/58/12. c) 16 March 45, Germany. d) F/276/70. e) Stanton: Divisional patrols reached the outposts of the West Wall on 6 Mar 45. The German forces withdrew 13 March 45 and the division began pursuit operations immediately, driving north to the Saar and crossing into Germany 14 March 45. Saarbruecken was attacked on 15 March 45.   f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot E, Row 6, Grave 10. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. See also item "Rosters Available" on page 3 of the February 2003 issue of Camp Fannin Guidon.  h) Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

VEIL, William.T., PFC, 33762987.   a) Johnstown, Pennsylvania. b) July-Dec. 43. c) 23 June 1944, near Cherbourg, France.   d) 8/4.  e) Stanton: The 4th Div. , reinforced by the 359th Inf. of the 90th Inf. Div., assaulted Utah Beach, France with the 8th Inf. leading 6 June 44. The 8th Inf. Regt. relieved the isolated 82nd Airborne Div. at Ste. Mere-Eglise and countered several German attacks 7 June 44. The following day the division began its drive on the Cotentin Peninsula toward Cherbourg, and the 22nd Inf. Regt. took Azeville fort and Ozeville 9 June 44 with naval gunfire support. The division reached Cherbourg’s main defenses by 21 June 44 and on 22 June 44 began its assault . On 25 June 44 it breached the fortress city and garrisoned it until relieved at the end of the month by the 101st Airborne Division.   f) Normandy American Cemetery, St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France. g) Emory A. Domen, 1990 Minno Drive, Johnstown, PA 15905-1172, who writes: "William Veil lived a quarter-mile from my home and was housed in the barracks next to mine during 17 weeks of basic training at Fannin. I have been to France many times and always paid my respects to his final resting place." Additional information provided by  Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

WALDO, Duane, PFC. a) Kalamazoo, Michigan. b) July-Sept. 43. c) January 1945, Battle of the Bulge. d) 17th Airborne Division. e) Stanton: The 17th Airborne Division was flown to the Reims area of France 23-25 Dec. 44 by emergency night flights and assembled at Mourmelon. The division defended the Meuse River from Givet to Verdun 27-31 Dec. 44 and relieved the 28th Inf. Div. in the Neufchateau area 1 Jan. 45. It attacked 3 Jan 45 five miles northwest of Bastogne and was strongly opposed at Dead Man’s Ridge, capturing Rechrival and Flamierge on 7 Jan. 45. The division gained then lost the high ground north of Laval and was forced out of Flamierge by German counterattack on 8 Jan. 45. On 11 Jan. 45 the German forces commenced withdrawal and the division moved up to retake Flamierge the next day. Salle fell without opposition on 13 Jan. 45, and the following day the 507th Parachute Infantry (attached) secured Bertogne while the 194th Glider Inf. took Givroulle and the division reached the Ourthe River. It took over the Hardingny-Houffalize line on 18 Jan. 45 and by 20 Jan. 45 had advanced beyond Tavigny. Steinbach and Limerle were occupied 22 Jan. 45 and the division continued behind the retreating Germans to take Espeler and Wattermal by 26 Jan. 45, when it was relieved by the 87th Inf. Div. f) Kalamazoo, Michigan. g) Joseph H. Quade, 4 Cain Court, Montville, New Jersey 02045, who was at Camp Fannin at the same time as Duane Waldo and also attended M.I.T. with him in the ASTP program. Joe Quade is also a 17th A/B Div. combat vet and editor of the Division Association’s publication, Thunder  From Above.  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

WALSH, Robert, PFC, 31435231. a) Massachusetts. c) 6 April 45, Germany. d) 290/75. e) Stanton: The 75th Inf. Div. attacked across the Dortmund-Ems Canal at Waltrop on 4 April 45 and began clearing the approaches to Dortmund. The division was reinforced by the 320th Inf. Regt. and reached the Ruhr at Witten with four regiments, taking two bridges intact on 11 April 45.   f) Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands, Plot P, Row 20, Grave 16. g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge, Air Medal with Gold Star (right).

 

WEBER, Robert E., Pvt., 36918499. a) Pontiac, Illinois. b) Oct. 1944-March 1945, D/51/11. c) 15 April 1945, Torfhaus, Germany. d) H/26/1. e) Per letter from Pvt. Weber’s company commander, 1st Lt. Paul C. Heath, to his father, Walter C. Weber: "On the 15th day of April 1945, you son’s company was assigned the mission of cutting a German-held road in the vicinity of Torfhaus, Germany. As the attack progressed, the company encountered enemy tanks which were set up as a defense against our advancing elements. Heavy fire was exchanged by both sides, and it was during this engagement that your son, while carrying ammunition for his machine gun squad, was killed by shrapnel from an exploding shell fired by an enemy tank. As his commanding officer, I want to assure you that he died as a soldier, fighting on the field of battle against the enemies of our country. He was killed instantly with no suffering or lingering pain." f) American Military Cemetery near Ittenbach, Germany; re-interred Patty Cemetery, Pontiac, Illinois. g) Donald and Jo Ely, RR #1, Cornell, Illinois 61319. h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge

 

WELSH, Burl W. Jr.  Pvt., 38687328.    a)  Oklahoma  b)  1944  c)  22 April 1945, Okinawa  f)  Turlock, California.  g)  <http://www.cagenweb.com/lr/stanislaus/staniobit.html> .

 

WENNER, Carl Finley, Pvt., 33940037. a) Knox, Pennsylvania. b) May-Oct. 44, D/51/11. c) 10 Dec. 44, Saarlautern, Germany. d) 379/95. e) Stanton: "The 379th Inf. Regt. battled into Saarlautern and crossed the bridge there 4 Dec. 44, driving into the West Wall. In house-to-house fighting and combat through mazes of pillboxes, the Saarlautern Bridgehead Battles commenced the same day. The 379th and 377th fought the Battle of Fraulautern, and the 379th fought the Battle for Saarlautern-Roden, until the division was relieved in line on 18 Dec. as the 5th Inf. Div. took over the fighting." f) Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France, Plot B, Row 23, Grave 11. g) Widow, Marie E. Wenner, Rt. 1, Cranberry, Pennsylvania 16319-9801. h) Carl Wenner was 31 years old and the father of four children at his death.  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge

 

 

WILDEVELD, Simion G., Pvt., 36915611.  a) Cook County, Illinois.   g) Carl A. Settle, 124 Culotta Drive, Hampton, Virginia 23666.

 

 

WRIGHT, Ralph E., PFC, 38687793. a) Cooper, Texas. b) May-Oct. 44. c) 18 Jan. 45, German POW facility. d) L/315/79. e) Ralph Wright died while a prisoner of war as the result of wounds received in action 11 January. Stanton: The 79th Div. reached the Lauter River at Schiebenhardt on 15 Dec. 44 and held defensive lines at Wissembourg until 2 Jan. 45. It then moved to the southern portion of the Rhine River. The Germans established a bridgehead at Gambsheim and by 6 Jan. the division had battled through Stattmatten to relieve encircled elements of the task force. German attacks forced the 315th Inf. out of Hatten and Rittershoffen, and by 12 Jan. the 14th Armd Div and 103rd Inf Div were committed to the battle. f) U.S. Military Cemetery, St. Avold, France. g) Widow, Doris Toon Alley, 3177 Hwy. 154, Cooper, Texas 75432.   h)   Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge

 

YEAPLE, Andrew Z., PFC, 42001056. a) New Jersey. b) July-Oct. 43, C/63/13. c) 13 Dec. 44, near the German West Wall. Elsenborn nearest large town. d) B/395/99. e) Ltr. from Robert R. Pierce: " During our attack on fortified positions of the West Wall, Andy was killed. Stanton: The 99th Div. landed at Le Havre, France on 3 Nov. 44 and assembled at Aubel, Belgium, and entered the line north of the Roer River between Schmidt and Monschau on 9 Nov. After a period of defensive patrolling, the division attacked toward the Roer and Urft Dams on 13 Dec. against heavy resistance from the West Wall.   f) Henri Chappelle Military Cemetery, Belgium, Plot D, Row 10, Grave 37. g) Robert R. Pierce, 9420 – 37 Ave. S.W., Seattle, Washington 98126, who writes: "Andy and I went through basic training together at Fannin, then were together in the ASTP program at Louisiana State University. We were sent to the 99th Inf. Div. in March of 1944, and were subsequently assigned to the same squad in B/395/99. I had a chance to visit his gravesite in 1989."  h)   Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

ZACHARY, Harry, PFC, 39417993. a) Fresno, California. b) Sept. 43-Feb. 44, C/52/11. c) 30 Oct. 44, France. d) 157/45. e) Stanton: "The 157 Inf. Regt. took Girmont 24 Sept. 44 and the division entered the western foothills of the Vosges. After severe fighting, Bruyeres fell 19 Oct. and after several attempts managed a bridgehead across the Morgagne near Fremifontaine 22-23 Oct. As the division was pushing slowly toward Raon-l’Etape west of the Meurthe. It was relieved 1-9 Nov and moved to a rest area." f) Epinal American Cemetery, France, Plot B, Row 12, Grave 10. g) Winston A. Bailey, 27211, Cranford Lane, Dearborn Heights, Michigan 48127, who writes: "Harry was a dear best friend. We took basic training together, same platoon. Looking for Harry, I visited his mother after the war and she told me that he had been killed."  h)   Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge

 

 

 

ZANG, Robert J., PFC., 36915409   a) Muskegon Heights, Michigan. b) D/61/13. c) 9 June 1945, Okinawa. f) Norton Cemetery, Norton Shores, Michigan. g) Thomas Vermilya, Jr., 3808 Pontaluna Road, Fruitport, Michigan 49415, who wrote: "We trained together at Fannin and Fort Ord, and went to Hawaii where we were separated. I learned of his death by a letter from home."  h)  Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge.

 

 

 

ZEIGLER, Clarence L., Sr. b) D/52/11. c) Anzio. g) Howard H. Hoblet, 6628 Tully-Harrison Road, Convoy, Ohio 45832, company clerk D/52/11 both at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and Camp Fannin. Learned of deceased’s death from Letter 4, dated Jan. 1, 1945, sent out to former members of D/52/11 by John B. Culbertson, then stationed in Ft. Meade, Md.

 

 

We add names of Camp Fannin veterans who died in uniform during World War II and make corrections continuously to our Roll of Honor as new information is provided. If you have personal knowledge of the death in uniform of someone else who served at Camp Fannin, please nominate him or her for membership in the Camp Fannin Roll of Honor. Write to Roll of Honor, 2213 Mendoza Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32304-1319 requesting a nomination form or e-mail your request to ethorne003@comcast.net.

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